Companion Planting

 

Companion planting is an intensive organic agriculture practice that mimics nature’s bio-diversity by combining multiple plants for a particular beneficial purpose, such as pest and disease control, efficient use of space, or nutrient management. As a bonus, companion planting often helps to enhance the taste and flavor of certain vegetables and herbs. Look for examples of companion planting at SCLT’s certified organic City Farm!

Here is some advice about pairings that you can follow in your own garden.

Basil: Improves growth and flavor of tomatoes. Do not plant near rue.

Chives: Improves growth and flavor of carrots and tomatoes; also believed to drive away Japanese beetles and prevent apple tree scab.

Dill: Improves health and growth of cabbage; great grown with lettuces, onions, or cucumbers as it may repel squash bugs, aphids, and spider mites. Do not grow near tomatoes -- dill attracts the tomato horn worm.

Garlic: Plant between tomatoes, eggplants, and cabbage or near roses to repel aphids, Japanese beetles, and other insects.

Peas: Help fix nitrogen in the soil. Plant with corn, a heavy nitrogen feeder.

Nasturiums: Plant as a barrier around tomatoes, radishes, cabbage, and cucumbers to help deter aphids, whiteflies, squash bugs, and cucumber beetles.

Rosemary: Plant with cabbage, beans, carrots, and sage to deter cabbage moths, bean beetles, and carrot flies.

Strawberries: Plant with spinach, lettuce, onions, and borage (also known as starflower) to increase growth.

Sunflowers: Plant with corn to increase yield, plus the seed heads provide food for birds to enjoy.


Companion planting is an intensive organic agriculture practice that mimics nature’s bio-diversity.